The Blog

Debugging network traffic with Charles

When you perform a URL Request in your app, you typically configure the request in your code and when it’s all set up you pass it off to a URLSession data task, and the request should succeed if everything goes as expected. When the request is misconfigured, the server will hopefully return a useful error and you can fix your code accordingly. There are times, however, where the server does not give the information you need. Or your requests succeed Read more…

Refactoring a networking layer to use Combine

In the past two weeks I have introduced you to Combine and I’ve shown you in detail how Publishers and Subscribers work in Combine. This week I want to take a more practical route and explore Combine in a real-world setting. A while ago, I published a post that explained how you can architect and build a networking layer in Swift without any third-party dependencies. If you haven’t seen that post before, and want to be able to properly follow Read more…

Tips to ask better questions

As developers, we all get stuck sometimes. When this happens we start searching for solutions on Google, or we ask questions on Stackoverflow, on the Swift forums, the iOS Developers Slack community or other places. Over the past couple of years, I have been actively trying to help people solve problems they were stuck on and while doing that, I noticed that the art of asking good questions is not an easy one. In today’s Quick tip I would like Read more…

Understanding Combine’s publishers and subscribers

In my previous post about Combine, I introduced you to Functional Reactive Programming (FRP) and I’ve shown you can subscribe to Combine publishers using the sink(receiveCompletion:receiveValue:) method. I also showed you how you can transform the output of publishers using some of its built-in functions like map and collect. This week I want to focus more on how Combine publishers and subscribers work under the hood. By the end of today’s post, you should have a clear picture of what Read more…

Five tips to write better todos in Xcode

We all write the dreaded // TODO: and // FIXME: comments every once in a while. Sometimes we do it because we know our code can be better but we’re not sure how, other times we don’t have the time to write an optimal solution because of deadlines, and other times we just want to move on to more interesting problems to solve and we just slap a // TODO: on our code and call it a day. In today’s Read more…

An introduction to Combine

The Combine framework. Silently introduced, yet hugely important for iOS. It didn’t get any attention during the big Keynote at WWDC 2019, but as soon as folks were in the sessions they knew that Combine was going to be huge. It implements a Functional Reactive Programming (FRP) paradigm that’s similar to that of Rx which is implemented by RxSwift, except it’s made by Apple and has native support on all Apple platforms as long as they are running iOS 13+, Read more…

Five ways to improve code with type aliases

Swift grants developers the ability to shadow certain types with an alternative name using the typealias keyword. We can use this feature to create tuples and closures that look like types, or we can use them to provide alternate names to existing objects. Today, I will show you five different applications of typealias that can dramatically improve your code when applied correctly. Let’s dive right in, shall we? 1. Improving readability with type aliases Perhaps this is the most obvious Read more…

Year in review: 2019

It’s the end of the year, and that means that we should all take a little bit of time to reflect on the past year. Some people like to reflect on their past year in a very statistical manner, they set measurable goals and they decide whether they met their goals at the end of the year. Personally, I don’t really set goals per year. I simply strive to do the best I can every year. In this post, I Read more…

Getting ready to publish your app on the App Store

You’ve done all the work to build your app, your UI looks amazing, animations are smooth and you’re ready to put your app in the hands of other people. Maybe you’re even ready to start offering your app on the App Store! This is a huge achievement if you are currently at this stage in your development cycle, I would like to congratulate you. Being ready to ship your app is a huge accomplishment, especially if it’s your first App. Read more…

Dependency injection with Storyboards and Xcode 11

For years I have had a bit of a love and hate relationship with Storyboards. I love how easy they make it for me to set up my AutoLayout constraints, but they can quickly grow unwieldy and for large projects with multiple developers Storyboards are hard to use because of merge conflicts that occur when multiple developers update the UI. For personal projects, however, my Storyboards tend to be small enough to manage. And since I’m the only developer working Read more…