How to use experimental Swift versions and features in Xcode?

Published on: April 18, 2024

If you’re keen on reading about what’s new in Swift or learn about all the cool things that are coming up, you’re probably following several folks in the iOS community that keep track and tell you about all the new things. But what if you read about an upcoming Swift feature that you’d like to try out? Do you have to wait for it to become available in a new Xcode release? Sometimes the answer is Yes, you’ll have to wait. But more often than not a Swift evolution proposal will have a header that looks a bit like this:...

Read more...

Actor reentrancy in Swift explained

Published on: April 11, 2024

When you start learning about actors in Swift, you’ll find that explanations will always contain something along the lines of “Actors protect shared mutable state by making sure the actor only does one thing at a time”. As a single sentence summary of actors, this is great but it misses an important nuance. While it’s true that actors do only one thing at a time, they don’t always execute function calls atomically. In this post, we’ll explore the following: Exploring what actor reentrancy is Understanding why async functions in actors can be problematic Generally speaking, you’ll use actors for objects...

Read more...

Building a backend-driven paywall with RevenueCat

Published on: April 4, 2024

On of app development’s largest downsides (in my opinion) is that it’s frustratingly hard for developers to quickly iterate on an app’s core features due to the App Review process which can take anywhere between a few hours to a few days. As a result of this process, developers either need to ship their apps with A/B testing built in if they want to test multiple variations of a feature, they can iterate more slowly or they can opt to build a so-called backend-driven UI. A backend-driven UI is a user interface that’s drawn by fetching information about the UI...

Read more...

Using closures for dependencies instead of protocols

Published on: April 2, 2024

It’s common for developers to leverage protocols as a means to model and abstract dependencies. Usually this works perfectly well and there’s really no reason to try and pretend that there’s any issue with this approach that warrants an immediate switch to something else. However, protocols are not the only way that we can model dependencies. Often, you’ll have a protocol that holds a handful of methods and properties that dependents might need to access. Sometimes, your protocol is injected into multiple dependents and they don’t all need access to all properties that you’ve added to your protocol. Also, when...

Read more...

Building an AsyncSequence with AsyncStream.makeStream

Published on: March 25, 2024

A while ago I’ve published a post that explains how you can use AsyncStream to build your own asynchronous sequences in Swift Concurrency. Since writing that post, a new approach to creating AsyncStream objects has been introduced to allow for more convenience stream building. In this post, I’ll expand on what we’ve already covered in the previous post so that we don’t have to go over everything from scratch. By the end of this post you will understand the new and more convenient makeStream method that was added to AsyncStream. You’ll learn how and when it makes sense to build...

Read more...

How to make sure your CI pipelines are always up to date?

Published on: March 12, 2024

When you work with CI, you’ll know how frustrating it can be when a CI server has versions of Xcode or other tools installed than the tools that you’re using. Especially major Xcode releases can be problematic. If your CI doesn’t have the same new versions available while your project uses recently released features which will lead your builds to fail. An obvious example of this would be when you start using features that are exclusive to the latest iOS version. If Xcode doesn’t know about these features then your project won’t build. An out of date CI can cause...

Read more...

Everything you need to know about Swift 5.10

Published on: March 7, 2024

The long awaited iOS 17.4 and iPadOS 17.4 have just been released which means that we could slowly but surely start seeing alternative app stores to appear if you’re an EU iOS user. Alongside the 17.4 releases Apple has made Xcode 15.3 and Swift 5.10 available. There’s not a huge number of proposals included in Swift 5.10 but that doesn’t make this release less significant. With Swift 5.10, Apple has managed to close some large gaps that existed in Swift Concurrency’s data safety features. In short, this means that the compiler will be able to catch more possible thread safety...

Read more...

Working with dates and Codable in Swift

Published on: February 29, 2024

When you’re decoding JSON, you’ll run into situations where you’ll have to decode dates every once in a while. Most commonly you’ll probably be dealing with dates that conform to the ISO-8601 standard but there’s also a good chance that you’ll have to deal with different date formats. In this post, we’ll take a look at how you can leverage some of Swift’s built-in date formats for en- and decoding data as well as providing your own date format. We’ll look at some of the up- and downsides of how Swift decodes dates, and how we can possibly work around...

Read more...

Designing APIs with typed throws in Swift

Published on: February 22, 2024

When Swift 2.0 added the throws keyword to the language, folks were somewhat divided on its usefulness. Some people preferred designing their APIs with an (at the time) unofficial implementation of the Result type because that worked with both regular and callback based functions. However, the language feature got adopted and a new complaint came up regularly. The way throws in Swift was designed didn’t allow developers to specify the types of errors that a function could throw. In every do {} catch {} block we write we have to assume and account for any object that conforms to the...

Read more...

How to determine where tasks and async functions run in Swift?

Published on: February 16, 2024

Swift’s current concurrency model leverages tasks to encapsulate the asynchronous work that you’d like to perform. I wrote about the different kinds of tasks we have in Swift in the past. You can take a look at that post here. In this post, I’d like to explore the rules that Swift applies when it determines where your tasks and functions run. More specifically, I’d like to explore how we can determine whether a task or function will run on the main actor or not. We’ll start this post by very briefly looking at tasks and how we can determine where...

Read more...