SwiftUI

Programmatic navigation in SwiftUI with NavigationPath and navigationDestination

Published on: May 22, 2024

One of the key features that was missing from SwiftUI when it first shipped was a good way to do programmatic navigation. There were some ways to handle this before iOS 16 introduced NavigationPath but it wasn’t very satisfying to use those APIs and they could be rather unreliable at times. To see an example, take a look at this post I wrote about handling deeplinks on iOS 14. In this post, I’d like to revisit programmatic navigation through iOS 16’s NavigationPath API which is a huge leap forward in terms of developer experience and reliability at the same time....

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Turn off sidebar hiding on NavigationSplitView in SwiftUI

Published on: May 21, 2024

By default, a NavigationSplitView in SwiftUI will show users an option to toggle the visibility of the sidebar. If you want to prevent this button from showing up so that users will always have to see your sidebar, you can do this by applying the toolbar(removing:) view modifier to your split view's sidebar as follows: NavigationSplitView(sidebar: { ExercisesList() .toolbar(removing: .sidebarToggle) }, detail: { ExerciseDetail(exercise: exercises.first!) }) The downside of doing this is that the button is hidden both in portrait and landscape modes. The result is that landscape users can no longer access your app's sidebar. To fix this you...

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Getting started with @Observable in SwiftUI

Published on: February 6, 2024

With iOS 17, we’ve gained a new way to provide observable data to our SwiftUI views. Until iOS 17, we’d use either an ObservableObject with @StateObject, @ObservedObject, or @EnvironmentObject whenever we had a reference type that we wanted to observe in one of our SwiftUI views. For lots of apps this worked absolutely fine, but these objects have a dependency on the Combine framework (which in my opinion isn’t a big deal), and they made it really hard for developers to limit which properties a view would observe. In iOS 17, we gained the new @Observable macro. I wrote about...

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SwiftUI’s Bindable property wrapper explained

Published on: June 30, 2023

WIth the introduction of Xcode 15 beta and its corresponding beta OSses (I would say iOS 17 beta, but of course we also get macOS, iPadOS, and other betas...) Apple has introduced new state mangement tools for SwiftUI. One of these new tools is the @Bindable property wrapper. In an earlier post I explained that @Binding and @Bindable do not solve the same problem, and that they will co-exist in your applications. In this post, I would like to clarify the purpose and the use cases for @Bindable a little bit better so that you can make better decisions when...

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Providing a default value for a SwiftUI Binding

Published on: November 15, 2022

Sometimes in SwiftUI apps I’ll find that I have a model with an optional value that I’d like to pass to a view that requires a non optional value. This is especially the case when you’re using Core Data in your SwiftUI apps and use auto-generated models. Consider the following example: class SearchService: ObservableObject { @Published var results: [SearchResult] = [] @Published var query: String? } Let me start by acknowledging that yes, this object can be written with a query: String = "" instead of an optional String?. Unfortunately, we don’t always own or control the models and objects...

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Xcode 14 “Publishing changes from within view updates is not allowed, this will cause undefined behavior”

Published on: September 7, 2022

UPDATE FOR XCODE 14.1: This issue appears to have been partially fixed in Xcode 14.1. Some occurences of the warning are fixed, others aren't. In this post I'm collecting situations me and others run into and track whether they are fixed or not. If you have another sample that you think is similar, please send a sample of your code on Twitter as a Github Gist. Dear reader, if you've found this page you're probably encountering the error from the post title. Let me start by saying this post does not offer you a quick fix. Instead, it serves to...

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Presenting a partially visible bottom sheet in SwiftUI on iOS 16

Published on: June 6, 2022

This post is up to date for Xcode 15 and newer. It supersedes a version of this post that you can find here On iOS 15, Apple granted developers the ability to present partially visible bottom sheets using a component called UISheetPresentationController. Originally, we had to resort to using a UIHostingController to bring this component to SwiftUI. With iOS 16, we don't have to do this anymore. You can make use of the presentationDetents view modifier to configure your sheets to be fully visible, approximately half visible, or some custom fraction of the screen's height. To do this, you can...

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Writing custom property wrappers for SwiftUI

Published on: January 16, 2022

It's been a while since I published my post that helps you wrap your head around Swift's property wrappers. Since then, I've done more and more SwiftUI related work and one challenge that I recently had to dig into was passing dependencies from SwiftUI's environment into a custom property wrapper. While figuring this out I learned about the DynamicProperty protocol which is a protocol that you can conform your property wrappers to. When your property wrapper conforms to the DynamicProperty protocol, your property wrapper will essentially become a part of your SwiftUI view. This means that your property wrapper can...

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Adding custom keys to the SwiftUI environment

Published on: January 10, 2022

Sometimes you’ll find yourself in a situation where you want to conveniently pass some object down via the SwiftUI environment. An easy way to do this is through the .environmentObject view modifier. The one downside of this view modifier and corresponding @EnvironmentObject property wrapper is that the object you add to the environment must be an observable object. Luckily, we can extend the SwiftUI environment to add our own objects to the @Environment property wrapper without the need to make these objects observable. For example, your app might have to do some date formatting, and maybe you’re looking for a...

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Understanding how and when SwiftUI decides to redraw views

Published on: November 7, 2021

There's a good chance that you're using SwiftUI and that you're not quite sure how and when SwiftUI determines which views should redraw. And arguably, that's a good thing. SwiftUI is clearly smart enough to make decent decisions without any negative consequences. In fact, you might even have set up your app in a way that coincidentally plays into SwiftUI's strength beautifully. There's an equal likelihood that your setup isn't as performant as you might think but you're just not seeing any issues yet. Recently, I had to figure out how SwiftUI determines that it should redraw views in order...

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